Temporary Disability Insurance

Because family and medical leave is typically unpaid, many women who may be eligible for leave cannot afford to take it. Indeed, an analysis by the Urban Institute found that 77 percent of employees who were eligible for and needed leave but chose not to take it made that decision for financial reasons, and 88 percent of this group said that they would have taken leave had some wage replacement been available.1 The Report Card examines states’ efforts to assist these women by providing some payment during family and medical leave periods through temporary disability insurance (TDI) laws. Such laws are usually provided through expansions of unemployment or disability insurance. Although limited, these laws provide partial wage replacement for employees who are temporarily disabled for non-work-related reasons and represent a first step toward making personal medical leave more affordable.2

Does the state provide temporary disability insurance?

States receive a "meets policy" if they provide TDI and a "no policy" if they do not.

State Strength of Policy Change from 2007
Alabama No Policy Same
Alaska No Policy Same
Arizona No Policy Same
Arkansas No Policy Same
California Meets Policy Same
Colorado No Policy Same
Connecticut No Policy Same
Delaware No Policy Same
District of Columbia No Policy Same
Florida No Policy Same
Georgia No Policy Same
Hawaii Meets Policy Same
Idaho No Policy Same
Illinois No Policy Same
Indiana No Policy Same
Iowa No Policy Same
Kansas No Policy Same
Kentucky No Policy Same
Louisiana No Policy Same
Maine No Policy Same
Maryland No Policy Same
Massachusetts No Policy Same
Michigan No Policy Same
Minnesota No Policy Same
Mississippi No Policy Same
Missouri No Policy Same
Montana No Policy Same
Nebraska No Policy Same
Nevada No Policy Same
New Hampshire No Policy Same
New Jersey Meets Policy Same
New Mexico No Policy Same
New York Meets Policy Same
North Carolina No Policy Same
North Dakota No Policy Same
Ohio No Policy Same
Oklahoma No Policy Same
Oregon No Policy Same
Pennsylvania No Policy Same
Rhode Island Meets Policy Same
South Carolina No Policy Same
South Dakota No Policy Same
Tennessee No Policy Same
Texas No Policy Same
Utah No Policy Same
Vermont No Policy Same
Virginia No Policy Same
Washington No Policy Same
West Virginia No Policy Same
Wisconsin No Policy Same
Wyoming No Policy Same

Policy Indicator Counts
Meets Policy: 
5
Limited Policy: 
0
Weak Policy: 
0
No/Harmful Policy: 
46
Better: 
0
Same: 
51
Worse: 
0

Data Source: Social Security Administration, Annual Statistical Supplement 2009, "Temporary Disability Insurance Program Description and Legislative History," available at http://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/statcomps/supplement/2009/tempdisability.... accessed September 8, 2010.

Footnotes: 

1 Katherin Ross Phillips, Urban Institute, “Getting Time Off: Access to Leave Among Working Parents,” April 2004, available at http://www.urban.org/publications/310977.html, accessed September 21, 2010.

2 National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, “Paid Leave in the States,” March 2009, available at  http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_864.html#16, accessed September 21, 2010.  Pregnancy is treated as a “temporary disability” for the purposes of state TDI laws, but for a limited number of weeks.  Furthermore, TDI does not cover leave to care for a newly adopted child, paternity leave, or leave to care for seriously ill family members.

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