First Trimester Prenatal Care (%)

Women who receive prenatal care beginning in their first trimester of pregnancy (i.e., within the first 12 weeks) tend to stay healthier and have healthier babies.1  Early initiation of prenatal care helps improve maternal and newborn health by connecting women with high-risk pregnancies to obstetrical and neonatal care.2 Certain vulnerable populations—including young women,3 poor women, women with lower education levels,4 and women in certain racial and ethnic groups5—are less likely to receive adequate prenatal care. It is particularly important to reach out to these underserved groups, who may otherwise go without beneficial prenatal services.

What percentage of pregnant women receive prenatal care in the first trimester?

The Report Card benchmark is the Healthy People 2010 goal that at least 90 percent of all pregnant women receive prenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy [Healthy People 2010, Objective 16-6a].

State State Overall Data State Grade State Rank
Alabama 1 81.7
Alaska 1 81.1
Arizona 1 77.7
Arkansas 1 79.5
California 1 85.9
Colorado 1 79.7
Connecticut 1 85.8
Delaware 1 75.9
District of Columbia 1 78.9
Florida 1 69.9
Georgia 1 83.3
Hawaii 1 81.8
Idaho 1 71.5
Illinois 1 86.2
Indiana 1 79.0
Iowa 1 86.4
Kansas 1 75.2
Kentucky 1 73.2
Louisiana 1 87.0
Maine 1 87.7
Maryland 1 81.7
Massachusetts 1 88.6
Michigan 1 85.4
Minnesota 1 86.5
Mississippi 1 83.2
Missouri 1 87.2
Montana 1 83.7
Nebraska 1 75.4
Nevada 1 71.5
New Hampshire 1 80.9
New Jersey 1 77.6
New Mexico 1 74.7
New York 1 76.1
North Carolina 1 82.6
North Dakota 1 74.7
Ohio 1 72.9
Oklahoma 1 75.6
Oregon 1 79.2
Pennsylvania 1 71.8
Rhode Island 1 84.5
South Carolina 1 66.7
South Dakota 1 70.5
Tennessee 1 67.6
Texas 1 61.6
Utah 1 80.2
Vermont 1 83.8
Virginia 1 84.2
Washington 1 70.3
West Virginia 1 82.8
Wisconsin 1 84.5
Wyoming 1 72.4

Data Source: First Trimester Prenatal Care (%), 2006. 

EXPLANATION:  This measure is the percentage of mothers who reported on their child’s birth certificate that they received prenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy.

SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, VitalStats. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/vitalstats.htm and at Kaiser Family Foundation, State Health Facts Online, “Percentage of Mothers Beginning Prenatal Care in the First Trimester by Race/Ethnicity, 2006” http://statehealthfacts.org/comparetable.jsp?ind=45&cat=2&sub=12&yr=61&typ=2. Currently, states use two different versions of the U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth, the source for prenatal care data used in the Report Card. Data collected using the two different birth certificate revisions are not comparable; therefore the Report Card does not grade or rank the states for this indicator. Data for 17 states--Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Washington, and Wyoming--is based on the 2003 Revision of the U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth. Data for the remaining the remaining 33 states and the District of Columbia is based on the 1989 Revision of the U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth.

Data collected using the two different birth certificate revisions are not comparable, making it impossible to establish a national estimate for early prenatal care use that is representative of the states collectively. The U.S. totals for the 17 states (and Puerto Rico) with data based on the 2003 revision are: 69.0% for all races, 76.2% for Non-Hispanic whites, 58.4% for Non-Hispanic blacks, and 57.7% for Hispanics. The U.S. totals for the 22 states and District of Columbia based on the 1989 revision is 83.2 % for all races, 88.1% for Non-Hispanic whites, 76.1% for Non-Hispanic blacks, and 77.3% for Hispanics.


Footnotes: 

1 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Healthy People 2010, 2nd ed. (Washington: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2000), at 16-28, available at: http://www.healthypeople.gov/Publications/.

2 McCormick, M. C., and J. E. Siegel, 2001. “Recent Evidence on the Effectiveness of Prenatal Care,” in Ambulatory Pediatrics 1 (6), (2001), 321-5.

3 Guttmacher Institute, “Facts on American Teens’ Sexual and Reproductive Health,” January 2010, available at http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/FB-ATSRH.html#1

4 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, National Healthcare Disparities Report, Figure 4.43, (Rockville: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2008) Available at  http://www.ahrq.gov/qual/nhdr08/Chap4d.htm

5 Kaiser Family Foundation, Putting Women’s Health Care Disparities on the Map: Examining Racial and Ethnic Disparities at the State Level, June 2009, available at  http://www.kff.org/minorityhealth/upload/7886.pdf

6 New York data exclude New York City. Data for New York City are based on the 1989 Revision of the U.S. Certificate of Live Birth and are 87.7 for Non-Hispanic whites, 75.0 for Non-Hispanic blacks, 77.9 for Hispanics, and 79.9 total.

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