Maternal Mortality Rate (per 100,000)

Maternal mortality is a key indicator of health worldwide and reflects the ability of women to secure maternal and other health care services. The maternal mortality ratio in the United States is 12.1 deaths per 100,000 live births. The lifetime risk of maternal death is greater in the U.S. than in 40 other countries, including almost all other industrialized nations.1 There are also marked disparities in maternal mortality in the U.S., as Black women face a disproportionately high risk of dying from pregnancy-related conditions when compared to white women.2

What is the maternal mortality rate?

The Report Card benchmark is the Healthy People 2010 goal of reducing the maternal mortality rate to no more than 3.3 per 100,000 live births [Healthy People 2010 Objective 16-4].  

State State Overall Data State Grade State Rank
Alabama 11.6 S- 33
Alaska 3.2 S 4
Arizona 7.5 S- 11
Arkansas 16.0 U 40
California 12.5 U 35
Colorado 10.9 S- 29
Connecticut 7.5 S- 11
Delaware 10.3 S- 25
District of Columbia 38.2 F 51
Florida 14.8 U 38
Georgia 20.9 F 49
Hawaii 13.9 U 37
Idaho 15.0 U 39
Illinois 7.8 S- 13
Indiana 2.9 S 3
Iowa 8.2 S- 15
Kansas 7.1 S- 9
Kentucky 8.1 S- 14
Louisiana 17.9 U 44
Maine 1.2 S 1
Maryland 18.7 U 45
Massachusetts 4.8 S- 5
Michigan 21.0 F 50
Minnesota 5.0 S- 6
Mississippi 19.0 U 47
Missouri 12.7 U 36
Montana 10.1 S- 23
Nebraska 9.0 S- 17
Nevada 10.0 S- 22
New Hampshire 9.2 S- 20
New Jersey 16.5 U 41
New Mexico 16.5 U 41
New York 18.9 U 46
North Carolina 10.9 S- 29
North Dakota 10.3 S- 25
Ohio 7.2 S- 10
Oklahoma 20.1 F 48
Oregon 6.5 S- 8
Pennsylvania 10.1 S- 23
Rhode Island 5.2 S- 7
South Carolina 12.0 S- 34
South Dakota 9.0 S- 17
Tennessee 11.0 S- 32
Texas 10.5 S- 28
Utah 9.9 S- 21
Vermont 2.6 S 2
Virginia 8.3 S- 16
Washington 9.0 S- 17
West Virginia 10.4 S- 27
Wisconsin 10.9 S- 29
Wyoming 17.0 U 43

Data Source: Maternal Mortality Rate (per 100,000 live born infants), 2001-2006.

EXPLANATION: Maternal mortality data are from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics, and the data have been aggregated to include data from 2001 through 2006.  Aggregation is necessary to control for the unreliability of the small values.  For 19 states, the number of maternal deaths over the period from 2001 through 2006 is less than 20.  The maternal mortality ratio is not based on the total population, but rather on deaths per 100,000 live-born infants.  Note, however, that the numerator includes some maternal deaths that were not related to live-born infants and thus were not included in the denominator.  Starting with 1999 mortality data, ICD-10 codes and classification were used for maternal deaths.

SOURCE:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Compressed Mortality File 1999-2006. CDC WONDER On-line Database, compiled from Compressed Mortality File 1999-2006 Series 20 No. 2L, 2009., available at http://wonder.cdc.gov/cmf-icd10.html, analyzed by Quality Resource Systems, Inc.  Data for live births from 2001 through 2006 also come from the CDC Wonder on-line site: United States Department of Health and Human Services (US DHHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Division of Vital Statistics, Natality public-use data 1995-2002, on CDC WONDER On-line Database, November 2005, available at http://wonder.cdc.gov/natality-v2002.html and United States Department of Health and Human Services (US DHHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Division of Vital Statistics, Natality public-use data 2003-2006, on CDC WONDER Online Database, March 2009, available at http://wonder.cdc.gov/natality-current.html, analyzed by Quality Resource Systems, Inc.

Footnotes: 

1 Amnesty International, “Deadly Delivery: The Maternal Health Care Crisis in the USA.” 2010, available at http://www.amnestyusa.org/dignity/pdf/DeadlyDelivery.pdf
2 Health Resources and Services Administration, Women’s Health USA 2008, “Maternal Mortality,” (Rockville: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, 2008), available at http://mchb.hrsa.gov/whusa08/hstat/mh/pages/237mm.html

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