Women in County without Abortion Provider (%)

The absence of health care providers trained and available to provide abortion services can endanger women’s lives and health. For instance, abortion provider shortages may delay access to abortion procedures, which are safer the earlier in pregnancy they are performed.1 Across the country, 87% of U.S. counties had no abortion provider in 2005, and as noted in the national report card, 35% of women live in these underserved counties.2,3  Poor access to abortion services is a particular concern in rural communities. In 2005, 97% of non-metropolitan counties had no abortion provider.4

What percentage of women live in a county without an abortion provider?

The Report Card benchmark is the goal that no women live in a county without an abortion provider.

State State Overall Data State Grade State Rank
Alabama 61.0 F 36
Alaska 23.0 S- 15
Arizona 16.0 S- 10
Arkansas 79.0 F 48
California 4.0 S- 3
Colorado 23.0 S- 15
Connecticut 10.0 S- 6
Delaware 18.0 S- 11
District of Columbia 0.0 S 1
Florida 20.0 S- 14
Georgia 62.0 F 37
Hawaii 0.0 S 1
Idaho 68.0 F 42
Illinois 34.0 U 20
Indiana 63.0 F 40
Iowa 56.0 F 31
Kansas 57.0 F 32
Kentucky 77.0 F 46
Louisiana 62.0 F 37
Maine 46.0 F 25
Maryland 19.0 S- 12
Massachusetts 7.0 S- 4
Michigan 33.0 U 19
Minnesota 62.0 F 37
Mississippi 91.0 F 50
Missouri 68.0 F 42
Montana 49.0 F 28
Nebraska 45.0 F 24
Nevada 12.0 S- 8
New Hampshire 19.0 S- 12
New Jersey 10.0 S- 6
New Mexico 47.0 F 26
New York 7.0 S- 4
North Carolina 48.0 F 27
North Dakota 75.0 F 45
Ohio 51.0 F 29
Oklahoma 57.0 F 32
Oregon 26.0 U 18
Pennsylvania 40.0 U 23
Rhode Island 39.0 U 22
South Carolina 72.0 F 44
South Dakota 78.0 F 47
Tennessee 59.0 F 35
Texas 35.0 U 21
Utah 55.0 F 30
Vermont 24.0 S- 17
Virginia 57.0 F 32
Washington 14.0 S- 9
West Virginia 84.0 F 49
Wisconsin 63.0 F 40
Wyoming 96.0 F 51

Data Source: Women in County without Abortion Provider (%), 2005.  

EXPLANATION:  This measure includes women ages 15-44 living in a county without an abortion provider (defined as a place where abortions are performed, e.g., a hospital, clinic, or physician's office).  If an organization offers abortion services at more than one location, each service site is counted as a provider.  The number of providers is different than the number of physicians who perform abortions, because one physician could be responsible for services in several facilities, and several physicians could perform abortions in a single setting.  An abortion is defined as “any procedure, including menstrual extraction and menstrual regulation, intended to terminate a pregnancy.” 

SOURCE: Jones RK, Zolna MR, Henshaw SK and Finer LB,  Abortion in the United States:

Incidence and Access to Services, 2005, Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2008, 40(1):6–16., Table 3. 

Footnotes: 

1 Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, “Abortion,” May 2008, available at: http://www.arhp.org/about-us/position-statements#1, accessed September 7, 2010.
2 Guttmacher Institute, “Facts on Induced Abortion in the United States,” May 2010, available at http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/fb_induced_abortion.html
3 Jones RK and others, “Abortion in the United States: incidence and access to services” in Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 40(1), (2008), 6–16.
4 Physicians for Reproductive Choice and Health at the Guttmacher Institute, “An Overview of Abortion in the United States,” January 2008, available at http://www.guttmacher.org/presentations/abort_slides.pdf.

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